Belsize NW3 Chiropractic

19 YEARS EXPERIENCE – BELSIZE PARK, NORTH LONDON CHIROPRACTOR

Michael H. Smith

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NW3Chiropractic’s Body Symmetry Series: “Pelvic Asymmetry and back pain”

Ever feel you’re walking crookedly or running with less power? Perhaps your feet don’t seem to land on the pavement as they used to? Runners developing new pains? Joggers wearing out differently?
We at NW3 Chiropractic see a lot of patients who complain of such signs in conjunction with mild to severe low back pain. Whilst no RCTs or proven clinical trials have yet been completed on this topic to our knowledge, we notice a correlation between pelvic asymmetry and low back pain with the many patients we see.
Such pelvic asymmetry could lead to mild spinal curvatures further up the spine, which come with their own issues. We will touch on that later but for now, try a simple test at home. Lie on your back on a completely flat floor and make sure you are as ‘straight’ as you can be. Ask an observer to photograph your feet with a camera on the floor below your feet. Then ask them to photograph you from above. It helps if there are symmetrical patterns or lines in the floor for the photograph to highlight asymmetries in your ‘straight’ position on the floor. From above, we often notice that patients align themselves in a crooked manner. This then is often associated with one foot rolling outward more than the other. If one foot does rotate outward more than the other, it could reflect a pelvic asymmetry which has translated to the legs. Obviously there could be other causes which would need to be discussed with your chiropractor but this exercise begins to build an awareness of your body which can help the situation; regardless of whether you seek professional treatment as well.

We will talk about other ways to measure and observe signs and symptoms of skeletal asymmetry over the coming months but if you are interested and would like a more immediate answer to a similar question, don’t hesitate to email nw3chiropractic@gmail.com and we will attempt to offer an answer.

All the best,

Michael H Smith

Evidence for the benefit of Chiropractic in the Treatment of Low Back Pain

Meade et al (1995) Randomised comparison of
chiropractic and hospital outpatient treatment for
low back pain: results from extended follow up. BMJ
311; 349-351

Funded by the MRC, confirmed the findings of the earlier report.

RCGP (1999) Clinical Guidelines for the Management
of Acute Low Back Pain

Funded by the Royal College of General Practitioners proved
that the risks of manipulation are very low in skilled hands and
it can provide short-term improvement in pain and activity
levels and higher patient satisfaction.

UK BEAM Trial Team (2004) United Kingdom back
pain exercise and manipulation (UK BEAM)
randomised trial: effectiveness of physical
treatments for back pain in primary care. BMJ
329:1377

Funded by the MRC, showed that exercise was better than “best
care” in general practice at three months. Adding manipulation
there was further improvement at three months and at 12
months.

UK BEAM Trial Team (2004) United Kingdom back
pain exercise and manipulation (UK BEAM)
randomised trial: cost effectiveness of physical
treatments for back pain in primary care. BMJ
329:1381

Spinal manipulation is a cost effective addition to “best care”
for back pain in general practice. Manipulation alone probably
gives better value for money than manipulation followed by
exercise.

NICE (2006) IPG 183 – Non-rigid stabilisation
techniques for the treatment of low back pain –
guidance

Results showed that chiropractic intervention and posture
training can limit episodes of acute pain. Spinal rehabilitation
can also be beneficial.

Department of Health (2006) Musculoskeletal
Services Framework

Showed that chiropractors provide evidence-based, timely and
effective assessment, diagnosis and management of certain
musculoskeletal disorders.

Low back pain: early management of persistent non-
specific low back pain

NICE guidelines May 2009
The evidence-based recommendations include the following:
Provide people with advice and information to promote self-
management of their low back pain.
Consider offering a course of manual therapy including spinal
manipulation of up to 9 sessions over up to 12 weeks
Consider offering a course of acupuncture needling comprising
up to 10 sessions over a period of up to 12 weeks
Consider offering a structured exercise programme tailored to
the individual.

European Commission Research Directorate General
(2004) European Guidelines for the management of
chronic non-specific low back pain in primary care
(2004)

Recommendation: Consider a short course of spinal
manipulation/mobilisation as a treatment option for chronic
low back pain.

European Commission Research Directorate General
(2004) European Guidelines for the management of
acute non-specific low back pain in primary care

Findings were not to prescribe bed rest but advise patients to
continue normal activities and take pain relief and muscle
relaxants, as required. Also to consider referral for spinal
manipulation.

CSF

CSF: Cerebrospinal Fluid production and reabsorption

    Produced in the choroid plexus of the lateral ventricles of the cerebrum, this fluid surrounds and nourishes the gray and white matter of the brain, as well as that of the spinal cord.
    Reabsorption occurs via the subarachnoid lymphatic system (and potentially not the arachnoid villi as previously thought); primarily in the area of the cribiform plate (at the floor of the cranium, just above the nose). This has been shown recently by Johnston, Toronto Canada.

    The CSF and therefore the intra-cerebral vaults, can be accessed via the cauda equina levels of the lumbar spine (lumbar puncture). Complications such as Hydrocephalus, can occur when the reabsorption or flow of CSF between the brain and the spinal cord is compromised.

    Research

    Meade et al (1995) Randomised comparison of
    chiropractic and hospital outpatient treatment for
    low back pain: results from extended follow up. BMJ
    311; 349-351

    Funded by the MRC, confirmed the findings of the earlier report.

    RCGP (1999) Clinical Guidelines for the Management
    of Acute Low Back Pain

    Funded by the Royal College of General Practitioners proved
    that the risks of manipulation are very low in skilled hands and
    it can provide short-term improvement in pain and activity
    levels and higher patient satisfaction.

    UK BEAM Trial Team (2004) United Kingdom back
    pain exercise and manipulation (UK BEAM)
    randomised trial: effectiveness of physical
    treatments for back pain in primary care. BMJ
    329:1377

    Funded by the MRC, showed that exercise was better than “best
    care” in general practice at three months. Adding manipulation
    there was further improvement at three months and at 12
    months.

    UK BEAM Trial Team (2004) United Kingdom back
    pain exercise and manipulation (UK BEAM)
    randomised trial: cost effectiveness of physical
    treatments for back pain in primary care. BMJ
    329:1381

    Spinal manipulation is a cost effective addition to “best care”
    for back pain in general practice. Manipulation alone probably
    gives better value for money than manipulation followed by
    exercise.

    NICE (2006) IPG 183 – Non-rigid stabilisation
    techniques for the treatment of low back pain –
    guidance

    Results showed that chiropractic intervention and posture
    training can limit episodes of acute pain. Spinal rehabilitation
    can also be beneficial.

    Department of Health (2006) Musculoskeletal
    Services Framework

    Showed that chiropractors provide evidence-based, timely and
    effective assessment, diagnosis and management of certain
    musculoskeletal disorders.

    Low back pain: early management of persistent non-
    specific low back pain

    NICE guidelines May 2009
    The evidence-based recommendations include the following:
    Provide people with advice and information to promote self-
    management of their low back pain.
    Consider offering a course of manual therapy including spinal
    manipulation of up to 9 sessions over up to 12 weeks
    Consider offering a course of acupuncture needling comprising
    up to 10 sessions over a period of up to 12 weeks
    Consider offering a structured exercise programme tailored to
    the individual.

    European Commission Research Directorate General
    (2004) European Guidelines for the management of
    chronic non-specific low back pain in primary care
    (2004)

    Recommendation: Consider a short course of spinal
    manipulation/mobilisation as a treatment option for chronic
    low back pain.

    European Commission Research Directorate General
    (2004) European Guidelines for the management of
    acute non-specific low back pain in primary care

    Findings were not to prescribe bed rest but advise patients to
    continue normal activities and take pain relief and muscle
    relaxants, as required. Also to consider referral for spinal
    manipulation.

        See

    Research 1

    UK BEAM Reportfor more information.

    Research 2

    Headachesfor more information.

    Research 3

    Manga Reportfor more information.

    Research 4
    Tendonopathy & Neo-vascularisation for more information.